L

ook Again invokes the viewer to take action.

Making your way through the shadow garden and into the white cube. Here, the process of art making is a cathartic release. Each painting, video, and sculpture is a display of emotional awareness. To be in awareness is to experience ourselves as an accumulation of mind, body, and primitive instincts rather than intense emotion. The artists’ philosophies collide in harmony and unsettling dissonance to create a metaphysical landscape populated by uncanny forms and fauna.

The exhibition is a winding path into the human’s deep subconscious. The viewer is immersed in a forest of anxiety and triumph. Iconography ignites the dialogue between death and rebirth. Uncertain if we are the predator or prey to the forest’s inhabitants creates a sense of vulnerability overriding our instinctual impulses. Those who aren’t able to orient and find awareness fall short to understand the artists’ creative pursuits. The choice between fight or flight is presented when the lights flicker on and off. As darkness surrounds the viewer, only the entrancing TV screen lights the white void. 

The exhibition is a winding path into the human’s deep subconscious. The viewer is immersed in a forest of anxiety and triumph. Iconography ignites the dialogue between death and rebirth. Uncertain if we are the predator or prey to the forest’s inhabitants creates a sense of vulnerability overriding our instinctual impulses. Those who aren’t able to orient and find awareness fall short to understand the artists’ creative pursuits. The choice between fight or flight is presented when the lights flicker on and off. As darkness surrounds the viewer, only the entrancing TV screen lights the white void. 

 

Look Again includes six artists; Pranav Sood, Meg Lionel Murphy, Ronan Day Lewis, Kate Stone, Cait McCormack, and Summer J Hart, in a curatorial project by Bree Scotti, opening at Rich Ramsays Studios in Brooklyn on March 26. 

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